Reconciling the Direct and Indirect Healthcare Factions

It is common to hear “Direct” and “Indirect” healthcare providers snipe at each other. This article encourages a truce between the two camps.

The Direct camp — mainstream medicine and science — often ridicules1 the many versions of Indirect camp — a very diverse sets of holistic practitioners and alternative providers. The Indirect advocates frequently launch counter-attacks. The fact that the Indirect camp is experiencing excellent marketplace growth adds spice to the debate. However, even within the … more

Book Review: The Demise of Guys

This new e-book is a fast tour of psychological issues facing boys and young men — generally age 35 and under. It offers many research-based observations about a mental health crisis facing this population which is losing its sense of direction and motivation to participate in real world activities like relationships and careers, due to brain (particularly within the nucleus accumbens and pleasure-reward circuits) and behavioral changes which are adaptations to over-use of online pornography … more

Book Review: Sills’ new Foundations Vol. 1

Foundations in Craniosacral Biodynamics Volume One, by Franklyn Sills

This is a spectacular achievement by Sills in basically totally overhauling his 2000 starter book. This book replaces the original Volume One but goes far beyond the first try in terms of clarity, scope and effectiveness. I knew this was coming and was oh-so-curious to find out which way Sills would go. It could have been a simple clean-up and update, but this new version is … more

Pranotherapy: Book Review: The Origins of Polarity Therapy and European Neuromuscular Technique

This new book is a great exploration of one part of the history of manual therapy, particularly the story of soft tissue work and its presence within Dr. Randolph Stone’s Polarity Therapy. It tells the story of Dr. Dewanchand Varma (ca. 1861-1950) and re-prints his long-lost book The Human Machine and its Forces. Revival of this book alone is a hugely beneficial fascination, but Pranotherapy goes further … more

Toe Reading

When I was first learning Polarity Therapy, one of the more preposterous concepts being presented was the idea that the shape and condition of a client’s toes can be a useful reflexology indicator of the Three Principles/Five Elements situation, guiding the process of creating a strategy for the session.

Having paid attention to this for many years, I can only conclude that the concept is valid, though … more

In Praise of Sports

My great-grandfather John Abercrombie Merritt is in the center of this photo from about 120 years ago. I carry his name. He lived in Pensacola Florida and always attended the World Series, if possible. This led to his wife becoming a Yankees fan because the shopping was better in New York than other turn-of-the-century baseball cities. She transferred that affiliation to me when I was about 8 … more

Book Review: ‘The Polyvagal Theory’ by Stephen Porges

The Polyvagal Theory, by Stephen Porges
Porges has just published a long-awaited book version of his revolutionary ideas. This book is highly technical and combines many of his articles from scientific journals. Overall I am a bit disappointed as the main points are obscured by the highly technical language. I am hoping for a book entitled, “Polyvagal Theory for Dummies,” but this is not it.

The main points of the Polyvagal Theory are:

  • The … more
  • Book Review: Foundations in Craniosacral Biodynamics Volume One, by Franklyn Sills

    This is a spectacular achievement by Sills in basically totally overhauling his 2000 starter book. This book replaces the original Volume One but goes far beyond the first try in terms of clarity, scope and effectiveness. I knew this was coming and was oh-so-curious to find out which way Sills would go. It could have been a simple clean-up and update, but this new version is really … more

    Book Review: In an Unspoken Voice, by Peter Levine

    Peter Levine is the creator of Somatic Experiencing and author of Waking the Tiger, which 15 years ago revolutionized trauma resolution therapy. In this new book, Levine updates his information and adds many practical insights. Basically this book replaces Waking the Tiger at the head of the line of books on how to work with trauma.

    I liked so many aspects of this book that they … more

    Book Review: The Polyvagal Theory, by Stephen Porges

    Porges has just published a long-awaited book version of his revolutionary ideas. This book is highly technical and combines many of his articles from scientific journals. Overall I am a bit disappointed as the main points seem to me to be a bit obscure. I am hoping for a book, “Polyvagal Theory for Dummies,” but this is not it.

    The main points of the Polyvagal Theory are:

    more